nobility of later medieval England
Read Online
Share

nobility of later medieval England the Ford lectures for 1953 and related studies by K. B. McFarlane

  • 439 Want to read
  • ·
  • 45 Currently reading

Published by Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • England,
  • Great Britain

Subjects:

  • Nobility -- Great Britain -- History -- To 1500.,
  • England -- Social conditions -- 1066-1485.,
  • Social history -- Medieval, 500-1500.,
  • England -- Social life and customs -- 1066-1485.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby K. B. McFarlane.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHT653.G7 M3 1980
The Physical Object
Paginationxxxvii, 315 p. :
Number of Pages315
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4105076M
ISBN 100198226578
LC Control Number80019732

Download nobility of later medieval England

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The nobility of later medieval England: The Ford lectures for and related studies, [McFarlane, K. B] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The nobility of later medieval England: The Ford lectures for and related studiesCited by: 6. The Education of the Nobility 7. Had Edward I a ‘Policy’ towards the Earls? 8. The English Nobility in the Later Middle Ages This may sound a little dry, but this is the kind of book where you will learn “why” things happened as well as “what”. For instance, he goes into 5/5(5). The Nobility of Later Medieval England, The Ford Lectures for and Related Studies. Oxford: The Clarendon Press, xlii, pp. ISBN: Very good publisher's black cloth hardcover with gilt stamped spine, in a very good dust jacket. $ for the important book which, now that Paravicini Bagliani has cleared the way, either he or another may in due course write. St. John's College, Cambridge P. A. LINE H A N The Nobility of Later Medieval England. By K. B. M CFA RLANE (Oxford: Clarendon Press, fC42z5). THE publication of the late K. B. McFarlane's The Nobility of Later.

The main sources for his scholarship are the book Lancastrian Kings and Lollard Knights, his Ford Lectures from published in as The Nobility of Later Medieval England, and the essays and shorter articles published by his student G. L. Harriss in under the Authority control: BIBSYS: , BNF: . ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xlii, pages, leaf. portraits 23 cm: Contents: 1. The English Nobility l Considerations Nobility and War Nobility and the Land Land and the Family iture e, Maintenance and Politics --Appendix Stratification of the Nobility and Gentry in. 'Andrew M. Spencer’s Nobility and Kingship in Medieval England provides a new and enterprising view of an old subject by arguing, contra almost everyone, that most of Edward’s earls were loyalists during the great crises of his reign and that their local power was more dependent on the defence and extension of jurisdictional rights than on their use of retainers to control the shires.'Cited by: 1. by Febru Our next book in the Book of the Month Club will be Political Society in Later Medieval England: A Festschrift for Christine Carpenter, edited by .

  If you were considered an illegitimate child in the late medieval time period to a family who is part of the nobility or the gentry, what kind of opportunities would be available to you? This question and others are explored in Helen Matthews’ book, “The Legitimacy of Bastards: The Place of Illegitimate Children in Later Medieval England”. McFarlane, K.B. The Nobility of Later Medieval England, The Ford Lectures for and Related Studies. Oxford: The Clarendon Press, xlii, pp. ISBN: Very good publisher's black cloth hardcover with gilt stamped spine, in a very good dust jacket. * Contents: 1. The English Nobility; i. General Considerations; : K. B. Mcfarlane. Buy The Nobility of Later Mediaeval England (Ford Lectures) New edition by McFarlane, Kenneth Bruce, Campbell, J. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(5). Central to a noble affinity was the lord's indentured retainers, and beyond them was a more amorphous group of general supporters and contacts. The difference, K. B. McFarlane wrote, was that the former did the lord "exclusive service" but the latter received his good lordship "in ways both more and less permanent" than the retainers. Christine Carpenter has described the structure of the earl.